Ask Babs: Handling ‘Whine Time’

Q: How do I not let whining bother me?

A: Close your ears? Sorry, I couldn’t resist that smart-alecky remark. Okay, let’s get down to some serious thinking on this frequently-asked-or-wish-we-had-asked query coming out of a real quandary nearly all we parents face at one time or another.

Fact: We adore our children, but we don’t adore a few of their behaviors. And one of those is best called Whine Time. But why do kids whine?

Turn it around to take a look at what you’d do if you were your child. In truth, wouldn’t you do some Whine Time if you wanted something and it wasn’t forthcoming? And what if you were dependent on another person, and you were within the seeing-hearing vicinity of that very person? Wouldn’t you engage in some Whine Time?

Furthermore, wouldn’t you reason that Whine Time just might get that person’s attention, especially since you’ve noticed how much your Whine-Time behavior bothers that person? And wouldn’t you ramp up your Whine Time sounds if you were tired or hungry or bored at the very same time when you want something that’s not forthcoming?

Those are a host of “if’s” in considering your whining. So what if we were to transfer all those conditions onto your child’s whining in order to ask and answer some questions about the last time your child’s whining bothered you. Let’s do it!

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WOW! Word™ of the Week: DELICIOUS

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Ask Babs: Easing my kids’ transition to a new school

Q: We’re moving this summer. Are there some tips to help make my child’s transfer to a new school easier?

A: There sure are! Many factors––time of year, distance, reasons––can contribute to your child’s and your own feelings of anxiety. Change is change. And since no one knows how a change will actually look and feel, it’s helpful to think, talk about, and play-act some possibilities.

How might this change look? How might it feel? Responses will vary with the imaginary settings you two create and talk about. The more possible scenarios you can imagine, the more helpful it will be for your child…and for you.

You will also want to take advantage of connectedness that’s possible via the Internet. Prior to the move or before that first day, locate the school online and enjoy a stress-free virtual visit to help your child and entire family feel acquainted with the new school, even if it’s from a long distance.

Using online information, let your fingers do the walking around that campus as you two talk about the facts you learn, such as the school’s name, the principal and staff, the buildings or departments, playground, cafeteria, the classrooms. Look for staff photos and particularly the teacher(s) whose class(es) your child will or may attend.
Make a list of all your child’s and your own questions about the new school. Then call or email to ask those questions. Be sure to ask if you might arrange an advance meet-up and walk-through, maybe even a half-day or full-day visit. Schools welcome such requests.
You might even schedule a special phone visit, conference call, or an email conversation between your child and the principal and/or the new teacher(s). Most seasoned educators welcome such opportunities.

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WOW! Word™ of the Week: POSSIBLE

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Peaceful Me

Babsy B Fuss-Fixer #2: Twinkly Peaceful Me

 

Sing this Babsy B Fuss-Fixer™ ditty to quiet your child when the fussies threaten to take over. Cuddle your child and use a softer and softer voice to where you are whispering as you sing or sing-song the ditty repeatedly.

 

Sing to tune of “Twinkle Twinkle”

 

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WOW! Word™ of the Week: VISIT

lilly-pond-805207_1280A WOW! Word™ is any word that, when used by a child in conversation, causes the listener to sit up and take notice. That’s positive attention, mind you. Positive attention that generally includes the verbal response, “Wow!”

It’s true. WOW! Words invite children––regardless of natural or learned language abilities––to be confident and powerful talkers, talkers who hold their listeners’ attention.

To introduce a new WOW! Word, merely begin using the word and any of its forms––visit, visited, visiting––often and every day. Look for opportunities to use the WOW! Word in daily conversations for a week or more. Then continue using the word as you add to your ever-growing collection of WOW! Words.

It’s noteworthy when your infant shows she understands words like bye-byemommy, or daddy. So too, you’ll notice her understanding of each new WOW! Word. And when she begins to lead those conversations, she’ll just naturally use every kind of word you’ve been modeling for her.

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Teach Your Child to Count in Order Using This Fun Poem

 

Let’s explore Jacks and More Jacks. This little book invites you and your child to count and compare some jacks in the “Jacks” game and six characters named Jack in nursery rhymes and fairy tales.Teaching Tip: Counting is a skill that’s learned over time.You’ve likely noticed how your child listens and watches when others count. And how your child likes to imitate that counting. In the beginning, your child may say number words in order but point to the objects helter-skelter. Or point to the objects in order but say number words in helker-skelter order. Or get it all correct one time but not every time. Counting objects correctly in one-to-one correspondence takes time, maturity, patience, and lots of practice.

 

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Ask Babs: When your toddler hits his newborn sis

Q: How should I respond when my 2-year-old tries to hit her newborn sister? Should I ignore it, or should I discipline her?

A: Notice it and approve it. Your noticing it addresses everyone’s need for protection. You’ll approve it by diving in to take advantage of this perfect opportunity to be your Two’s first best teacher.

This “hit” is your toddler’s way of showing interest, coupled with her wish to connect. She’s also showing that she doesn’t have a clue how to explore this “thing.” After all, your Two is thinking, this thing everyone calls “the baby” appears to be here to stay. She’s learned that touching is a useful way to explore and learn about things around her. So now’s a great time for “I Touch Gently,” a little poem that can help all three of you get your needs met.
When you see your Two going near the baby, hover over and use your index finger to model how you touch Baby ever so gently. At the same time, begin to say these words softly and lovingly (or sing to “Are You Sleeping?” tune):

I touch gently.
I touch gently.
Watch me touch.
Watch me touch.
Look how I touch gently.
Look how I touch gently.
Watch me touch.
Watch me touch.

Continue using the words and your finger to model how you can touch Baby, your own arm, your toddler’s arm, and something else right there by you. Then touch Baby again. Touching your Two as part of this routine allows her to feel how lightly your finger comes to rest on her skin.
Model all this gentle touching and speaking until your toddler begins to touch the baby just as gently as you’ve shown her. Keep in mind while that you know this touching skill, she doesn’t. So at first, she may need your finger to gently guide hers.
Now it’s time to help your Toddler Two move on to another activity. Moving on helps focus your toddler on other important things in her life. It also gives her––and you––opportunities to try out that new tool she’s just learned. Soon, she will look to you as she reaches out to touch something. She’s asking if it’s fragile like Baby. She’s also asking you to repeat those meaningful words––those words about touching.
Notice that you’ve stayed focused on your child’s need to learn while helping her connect with the new baby. You’ve kept your cool and been positive while managing to keep everyone safe. And you’ve modeled in context a useful WOW! Word™ http://www.ilikeme.com/this-weeks-wow-word-available,
vocabulary that you and your Two will use again and again.
With your gentle guidance and the little poem, your Toddler Two will soon be reminding you to touch gently! Happy touching!

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WOW! Word™of the week: Attach

kids-756301_1280A WOW! Word™ is any word that, when used by a child in conversation, causes the listener to sit up and take notice. That’s positive attention, mind you. Positive attention that generally includes the verbal response, “Wow!”

It’s true. WOW! Words invite children––regardless of natural or learned language abilities––to be confident and powerful talkers, talkers who hold their listeners’ attention.

To introduce a new WOW! Word, merely begin using the word and any of its forms––attach, attached, attachment––often and every day. Look for opportunities to use the WOW! Word in daily conversations for a week or more. Then continue using the word as you add to your ever-growing collection of WOW! Words.

It’s noteworthy when your infant shows she understands words like bye-byemommy, or daddy. So too, you’ll notice her understanding of each new WOW! Word. And when she begins to lead those conversations, she’ll just naturally use every kind of word you’ve been modeling for her.

This week’s WOW! Word: attach

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The Nouns Game™

woman_and_child_large

Let’s play The Nouns Game™ with your child of any age today. This talking game is a good way to build your child’s oral language or storehouse of vocabulary and knowledge. You can even talk this activity with an infant! And it’s another free activity you can do with your child anywhere you are. Here’s how:

First off, let’s remind ourselves that a noun names a person, a place, or a thing. Nouns are words that name those tangible or real things you’ll help your child see and touch today. As you say a sentence such as “We’ll take the dog with us,” just emphasize the word “dog” that names an animal, a thing. Specific nouns and sentences you model depends on your child’s age and interests and on the activity the two or you are doing in the moment.

As you play The Nouns Game, you can model added vocabulary and knowledge by occasionally saying this sentence: “Nouns name some tangible or real things we can see and touch.

Here are some sentences you might say with your infant or toddler today: Continue reading

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