Teach Your Child to Count in Order Using This Fun Poem

 

Let’s explore Jacks and More Jacks. This little book invites you and your child to count and compare some jacks in the “Jacks” game and six characters named Jack in nursery rhymes and fairy tales.Teaching Tip: Counting is a skill that’s learned over time.You’ve likely noticed how your child listens and watches when others count. And how your child likes to imitate that counting. In the beginning, your child may say number words in order but point to the objects helter-skelter. Or point to the objects in order but say number words in helker-skelter order. Or get it all correct one time but not every time. Counting objects correctly in one-to-one correspondence takes time, maturity, patience, and lots of practice.

 

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Ask Babs

Q: How should I respond when my 2-year-old tries to hit her newborn sister? Should I ignore it, or should I discipline her?

A: Notice it and approve it. Your noticing it addresses everyone’s need for protection. You’ll approve it by diving in to take advantage of this perfect opportunity to be your Two’s first best teacher.
This “hit” is your toddler’s way of showing interest, coupled with her wish to connect. She’s also showing that she doesn’t have a clue how to explore this “thing.” After all, your Two is thinking, this thing everyone calls “the baby” appears to be here to stay. She’s learned that touching is a useful way to explore and learn about things around her. So now’s a great time for “I Touch Gently,” a little poem that can help all three of you get your needs met.
When you see your Two going near the baby, hover over and use your index finger to model how you touch Baby ever so gently. At the same time, begin to say these words softly and lovingly (or sing to “Are You Sleeping?” tune):

I touch gently.
I touch gently.
Watch me touch.
Watch me touch.
Look how I touch gently.
Look how I touch gently.
Watch me touch.
Watch me touch.

Continue using the words and your finger to model how you can touch Baby, your own arm, your toddler’s arm, and something else right there by you. Then touch Baby again. Touching your Two as part of this routine allows her to feel how lightly your finger comes to rest on her skin.
Model all this gentle touching and speaking until your toddler begins to touch the baby just as gently as you’ve shown her. Keep in mind while that you know this touching skill, she doesn’t. So at first, she may need your finger to gently guide hers.
Now it’s time to help your Toddler Two move on to another activity. Moving on helps focus your toddler on other important things in her life. It also gives her––and you––opportunities to try out that new tool she’s just learned. Soon, she will look to you as she reaches out to touch something. She’s asking if it’s fragile like Baby. She’s also asking you to repeat those meaningful words––those words about touching.
Notice that you’ve stayed focused on your child’s need to learn while helping her connect with the new baby. You’ve kept your cool and been positive while managing to keep everyone safe. And you’ve modeled in context a useful WOW! Word™ http://www.ilikeme.com/this-weeks-wow-word-available/,
vocabulary that you and your Two will use again and again.
With your gentle guidance and the little poem, your Toddler Two will soon be reminding you to touch gently! Happy touching!

P.S. This is also a great Talking Op™, a time to help her develop more oral vocabulary. Model the use of synonyms interchangeably by tossing into your “touching gently” conversations these words and others with similar meanings––gentle and careful, fragile and delicate and breakable, gently and carefully.

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WOW! Word™of the week: Attach

kids-756301_1280A WOW! Word™ is any word that, when used by a child in conversation, causes the listener to sit up and take notice. That’s positive attention, mind you. Positive attention that generally includes the verbal response, “Wow!”

It’s true. WOW! Words invite children––regardless of natural or learned language abilities––to be confident and powerful talkers, talkers who hold their listeners’ attention.

To introduce a new WOW! Word, merely begin using the word and any of its forms––attach, attached, attachment––often and every day. Look for opportunities to use the WOW! Word in daily conversations for a week or more. Then continue using the word as you add to your ever-growing collection of WOW! Words.

It’s noteworthy when your infant shows she understands words like bye-byemommy, or daddy. So too, you’ll notice her understanding of each new WOW! Word. And when she begins to lead those conversations, she’ll just naturally use every kind of word you’ve been modeling for her.

This week’s WOW! Word: attach

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The Nouns Game™

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Let’s play The Nouns Game™ with your child of any age today. This talking game is a good way to build your child’s oral language or storehouse of vocabulary and knowledge. You can even talk this activity with an infant! And it’s another free activity you can do with your child anywhere you are. Here’s how:

First off, let’s remind ourselves that a noun names a person, a place, or a thing. Nouns are words that name those tangible or real things you’ll help your child see and touch today. As you say a sentence such as “We’ll take the dog with us,” just emphasize the word “dog” that names an animal, a thing. Specific nouns and sentences you model depends on your child’s age and interests and on the activity the two or you are doing in the moment.

As you play The Nouns Game, you can model added vocabulary and knowledge by occasionally saying this sentence: “Nouns name some tangible or real things we can see and touch.

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This week’s WOW! Word: available

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A WOW! Word™ is any word that, when used by a child in conversation, causes the listener to sit up and take notice. That’s positive attention, mind you. Positive attention that generally includes the verbal response, “Wow!”

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WOW! Word™ of the Week: OCCUPY

WOW! WordsA WOW! Word™ is any word that, when used by a child in conversation, causes the listener to sit up and take notice. That’s positive attention, mind you. Positive attention that generally includes the verbal response, “Wow!”

It’s true. WOW! Words invite children––regardless of natural or learned language abilities––to be confident and powerful talkers, talkers who hold their listeners’ attention.

To introduce a new WOW! Word, merely begin using the word and any of its forms––available, availability––often and every day. Look for opportunities to use the WOW! Word in daily conversations for a week or more. Then continue using the word as you add to your ever-growing collection of WOW! Words.  

It’s noteworthy when your infant shows she understands words like bye-byemommy, or daddy. So too, you’ll notice her understanding of each new WOW! Word. And when she begins to lead those conversations, she’ll just naturally use every kind of word you’ve been modeling for her.

This week’s WOW! Word: occupy

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Focusing Talk Tip: The Bridge Is Up!

Here’s a Fuss Fixer that you have right there with you wherever you are! Focusing Talk™ is a fun way to help your child find meaning in the language of books. It models for him how to take words and ideas from a favorite book for use in daily conversations. Focusing Talk around a familiar book also helps him notice that words you read aloud from a book are just like words people say when they talk.

Your child will pay attention when you Focus Talk around  a book she knows. And Focusing Talk––connecting “book talk” with “talk talk”––gives your infant or toddler a head start toward later successes in reading and writing.

Before you Focus Talk around a book’s language, just read the book aloud several times. Then, here’s how to do some Focused Talking around a particular picture book, The Bridge Is Up! by Babs Bell Hajdusiewicz.

The Bridge is Up!

The-Bridge-Is-Up-9780153650895

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WOW! Word™ of the Week: CONVERSATION

WOW WordsA WOW! Word™ is any word that, when used by a child in conversation, causes the listener to sit up and take notice. That’s positive attention, mind you. Positive attention that generally includes the verbal response, “Wow!”

It’s true. WOW! Words invite children––regardless of natural or learned language abilities––to be confident and powerful talkers, talkers who hold their listeners’ attention.

To introduce a new WOW! Word, merely begin using the word and any of its forms––available, availability––often and every day. Look for opportunities to use the WOW! Word in daily conversations for a week or more. Then continue using the word as you add to your ever-growing collection of WOW! Words.  

It’s noteworthy when your infant shows she understands words like bye-byemommy, or daddy. So too, you’ll notice her understanding of each new WOW! Word. And when she begins to lead those conversations, she’ll just naturally use every kind of word you’ve been modeling for her.

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In a culture of interruption, two great ways to teach a child one of life’s most basic values.

05br270Interrupting a Talker is not only impolite; it could lead to totally-erroneous information. Just this morning, I nearly interrupted my senior friend’s sentence. She was telling about her having recently taken some drug. She told how it had “helped her get pr–…”

Immediately I knew — or thought I knew — what she was about to say, and it was a slightly impish thought at that. And how badly I wanted to interrupt with an all-important-to-me thought on where her sentence sounded like it was heading.

But, no. I kept my listening ears politely tuned, all the while thinking about what Great Interrupters we adults are.

Yes. Take a moment and listen to two adults in conversation. It’s shocking the number of times Great Interrupters act totally oblivious to the fact that someone else is holding the Talking Stick.

Yet, we expect far-different behavior from children. We teach and preach; we jabber and clabber about the necessity of not interrupting others.

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One word that proves kids love language as much as they love dessert.

uriel_blueberriesEvery child understands the power of language to make things happen. For years now, I’ve measured the success of my poems and songs for kids by how much they say “More!” or “Do it again!” after listening.

I call such poems and songs “desserts,” because kids like them enough to ask for more, and just as excitedly as they might ask for more cake or ice cream––or more blueberries.

A case in point: My neighbor Uriel, a delightful 18-month-old who’s learning three languages. I saw him and his mama recently while I was power-walking in the neighborhood. I learned that Uriel had recently discovered, at a party, that he could get the adults around him to give him all the blueberries he wanted, just by saying “More!”

As his mama and I were talking, I could see that little Uriel was listening. And his eyes were fixated on my mouth. He was putting much study into my every word and facial expression. He was looking for familiar words . . . looking for meaning behind those words. Young children are truly language sponges.

His mama stops now to recite and act out with him a poem she’s written. In English. He giggles and wiggles to all that familiarity.

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